PATTERN OF VASCULAR INVOLVEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH LOWER EXTREMITY PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE

Authors

  • Mukesh Kumar National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NICVD), Karachi, Pakistan
  • Naveedullah Khan National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Javed Jalbani National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Ghulam Shabbir Shar National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Haroon Ishaq National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Abdul Hakeem Shaikh National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47144/phj.v55i2.2193

Abstract

Objectives: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is still underdiagnosed and undertreated diseases accounts for a considerable part of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the pattern of vascular involvement in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease.

Methodology: In this study we reviewed hospital record files and angiographic films of the patients’ undergone conventional peripheral angiography. Patterns of vascular involvement was assessed in terms of involved arterial segments, site (right, left, or both), size (%), and type of lesion (discrete, tubular, or diffused).

Results: A total of 74 patients were included, out of which 60 (81.1%) patients were male. A majority, 85.1% (63), were diabetic, 78.4% (58) were hypertensive, 43.2% (32) were smokers, and 23% (17) had coronary artery disease. The most common involved location was superficial femoral (51.4%) followed by anterior tibial (45.9%), posterior tibial (45.9%), popliteal (21.6%), and peroneal (16.2%). Female patients had significantly higher rate of superficial femoral diseases as compare to the male patients with rate of 85.7% (12/14) vs. 43.3% (26/60); p=0.004 respectively.

Conclusion: In conclusion, the most common risk factor for PAD was found to be diabetes and a significant number of patients were also found to have hypertension, and smoking. The most common involved segment was superficial femoral in our population followed by anterior tibial, posterior tibial, popliteal, and peroneal.

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Published

2022-07-05

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Original Article